Quantcast

“Could You Lift Up Your Bottom?” by Hee-jung Chang, illustrated by Sung-hwa Chung

Source: Independent Publishers Group
Hardcover,
I am an Amazon Affiliate

“Could You Lift Up Your Bottom?” by Hee-jung Chung, illustrated by Sung-hwa Chung, is a math concepts book that explains figures, shapes, and space in a story.  This story centers on a frog who loses his favorite hat and an elephant who sits on it and takes advantage of the situation.  He has the frog get him food in different shapes and sizes, and promises each time to lift his butt off of the frog’s hat.  It becomes clear to the frog that he will have to be more savvy than the elephant who is being unkind.

Although my daughter and I read this book and we called out the shapes together until she was confident herself to shout them out alone, she told me that the elephant — who looks like a mixed media hodgepodge — was scary looking.  It was hard for her to focus on this book given her response to the elephant, but I tried to refocus her on the shapes in the book.

“Could You Lift Up Your Bottom?” by Hee-jung Chung, illustrated by Sung-hwa Chung, includes a great breakdown of categories for shapes — round shapes including circles and ovals, etc.  There are some interesting activities in the back that involve food as well, which my daughter enjoyed.  Overall the concepts in the book are well planned out and discussed, but the drawings here are less pleasant than those in the other books of this series.

Who Eats First? by Ae-hae Yoon, illustrated by Hae-won Yang

Source: Independent Publishers Group
Hardcover, 38 pgs
I am an Amazon Affiliate

Who Eats First? by Ae-Hae Yoon, illustrated by Hae-won Yang, is another book in the math concepts of books that teach math basics through story-telling.  This book is a story about placing items and animals in various orders from smallest to biggest, fattest to smallest, and tallest to shortest.  This helps children understand how to differentiate size and type using animals.  The activities in the back are relatively easy to execute from putting numbered cards in order, rearranging them and having people draw them and then being placed in order.  These books would be great for classroom use.

Finding a delicious peach in the rainforest might seem odd, but these animals only care how good it will taste once they bite into it.  While they all want to share it, they are unsure who should go first when taking that first juicy bite.  There are different attempts to measure the animals and determine who should go first, but there are also discussions about differences, like who has the most legs, the longest ears, the longest tail, the longest neck, etc.  The book goes over the various ways to measure things from height to weight and more.  The pictures will help kids understand those concepts clearly.

Who Eats First? by Ae-Hae Yoon, illustrated by Hae-won Yang, is engaging and fun, and the activities can help parents and teachers engage children in math lessons.  My daughter and I have had fun measuring a variety of things in the house and outside, and spying differences between animals and ourselves.

A Day at Grandma’s by Mi-ae Lee, illustrated by Yang-sook Choi

Source: Independent Publishers Group
Hardcover, 34 pgs
I am an Amazon Affiliate

A Day at Grandma’s by Mi-ae Lee, illustrated by Yang-sook Choi, is part of a series of math concepts books that teach basic math concepts through story-telling.  This book has a focus on time of day — dawn, morning, noon, afternoon, dusk, and night — and the difference between today, yesterday, and tomorrow.  The young girl spends an entire day with her grandmother, while her mother goes about her day, missing her daughter.  The mother talks about what she and her daughter would do at each time of day together and the daughter at her grandmother’s explains how she spends her day with her grandmother and compares it to life at home.

This simple story, children can learn how long an actual day is and can create a pie chart filled with their own activities, like the one in the back of the book.  Children that love art projects could turn this pie chart into something really visual with cut outs from magazines and newspapers, as well as drawings.  Parents should explain the different times of day and what accomplishments and activities they do as a family during those time periods.

A Day at Grandma’s by Mi-ae Lee, illustrated by Yang-sook Choi, is a cute story on its own about spending time away from our parents, even as young kids and how that can be an adventure filled with stories to be shared, rather than something that’s scary.  It also can help teach children about different times of day, and allow them to look at their own lives and routines in new ways.