Quantcast

Guest Post & Giveaway: My Mr. Darcy & Your Mr. Bingley by Linda Beutler

Today, I’d like to welcome Linda Beutler to the blog to talk about her latest Pride & Prejudice variation and the poetry. But first, read a little about her book below:

About the Book:

One never quite knows where the inspiration will strike. For award-winning author Linda Beutler and My Mr. Darcy & Your Mr. Bingley, the moment of genesis arrived in a particularly contentious thread at the online forum A Happy Assembly. What is the nature of personal responsibility? Where do we draw the line between Mr. Bingley being too subject to Mr. Darcy’s “persuasion” and Mr. Darcy playing too heavily on Mr. Bingley’s “sensibility”? This is a conundrum guaranteed to raise even more questions.

What happens to the plot and character dynamics of Pride & Prejudice if Mr. Bingley is given just a dash more spine? Or if Jane Bennet decides enough embarrassment is too much? How does Mr. Darcy manage the crucial apology a more stalwart Mr. Bingley necessitates he make? What if Mr. Darcy meets relations of Elizabeth Bennet’s for whom she need not blush on their home turf rather than his? Suffice it to say, this is a story of rebuked pride, missing mail, a man with “vision”, a frisky cat, and an evening gown that seems to have its own agenda.

Please check out her post on Dark Poetry and Othello:

Thanks, Serena, for hosting a stop on the My Mr. Darcy & Your Mr. Bingley blog tour here at Savvy Verses and Wit. The focus of your interest in verse and poetry has afforded me the opportunity to revisit my favorite chapter of the book through a new filter, even though I had no thoughts of writing verses when I wrote it! Poetry isn’t always light and happy and flowers that bloom in the spring, tra-la. By setting the chapter in question during a performance of Othello, the narrative could go to a much unhappier place, inhabited by a scorned lover and a lady consumed by regret, following the lead of that most masterful poet, Shakespeare. Let me explain…

One could go on at great length to describe the poetry in prose, and I shall try to avoid excess! During my years as an English major, my tastes evolved away from poetry as such, perhaps due to becoming exhausted with fretting over the components of it to the detriment of simple emotional enjoyment (scansion and meter and rhymes—oh my!). However, in one particular chapter in My Mr. Darcy & Your Mr. Bingley, I did get a chance to delve back into my poetic roots, in the darkest portion of my story and its link to Othello.

In chapter 15, Of All the Theatres in London, Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet take in an evening at the theatre, watching Othello in adjoining boxes not even two weeks after their disastrous conversation at Hunsford. There are several reasons I chose Othello, the most important of which are that it gives a real-life London actress, Mrs. Siddons, a chance to portray a character much younger than herself at the time of the story (which Mrs. Siddons typically did, vain creature!); that Othello is arguably the bleakest of Shakespeare’s plays (we can see the ending coming ten miles off and are powerless to stop it or look away, and such a wicked villain); Othello was the first Shakespeare I saw staged by a professional company (the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland, Oregon) and the performance thoroughly opened my eyes to the poetry that is Shakespeare.

Although at various points the chapter unfolds through different perspectives, we end with Elizabeth’s point of view before the omniscient narrator ties everything up with a neat if dismal black ribbon. Even in a darkened theatre, it is a highly visual scene, the sort that might have easily been added to Othello. Elizabeth is fearful of Darcy’s mood. Darcy already feels himself to be a damned soul—with nothing to lose. Their relatives are there to see the full display of their mutual discomfort. Elizabeth is in a stunning gown, yet she (unlike Darcy) is the one spending more time staring. And yet, neither Darcy nor Elizabeth witness their own actions with anything approaching accuracy. It is their families who truly come to understand something has happened.

If we look at Darcy and Elizabeth in this scene as Othello and Desdemona, there is one key difference. In Shakespeare’s play, Desdemona is an unwitting innocent. Her trust in her husband (and indeed everyone, more like a Jane Bennet) has been played against her. Desdemona meets her death scene unwittingly. But Elizabeth Bennet knows she has acted wrongly. She has maligned Darcy unjustly and vociferously. She knows she has hurt him, and this unexpected meeting reveals just how much.

And of course Darcy does not wish to murder Elizabeth, but he does wish himself anywhere else but in this particular theatre. If he could snuff out his attachment to her, he would. And yet, at the key moment of the play, when Mrs. Siddons chews up the scenery whilst being strangled, Elizabeth drops her shawl and Darcy does the gentlemanly thing, bending into the adjoining box to fetch it up. Elizabeth thinks she successfully fights the urge to touch his hair with compassion (his head is briefly near her knees). Everyone except Darcy sees the attenuated spasm of her fingers.

Mrs. Siddons dies with a flamboyant gasp as Elizabeth’s love for Darcy sparks to life. Shouts of “Brava!” do not penetrate Elizabeth’s deepening internal shame. Darcy and Elizabeth leave the theatre with superficial anger, but much deeper sadness. Yes, if I do say so myself, with the example of the poetry of Othello before me, it might be the closest I’ve ever come to writing a prose poem. It has what I see as the typical elements of dark epic poetry: strong visual imagery, a clear plot, determined manipulation of the emotions of both the characters and the readers, not a happy ending in sight.

It has long been debated whether poetry has the more adept and profound ability to elicit emotion than does prose. I would rather say it is when prose nears the poetic that it has any emotional power at all. It is when they join, when an author can provide the imagery and action regardless of the niceties of rhythm and rhyme, that sensation is evoked in the reader. With the emotional veracity and imagery of Othello before me, both as vivid memory and the open pages of the text, I hope readers will connect with a distraught Elizabeth and Darcy, comprehending them as I do, and as they cannot comprehend themselves.

~~~~~

I must say this in defense of lighter verse: In my next story, a mash-up of Jane Austen and P. G. Wodehouse, one character is given to limericks of adoration! And if you really want a brilliantly bawdy ballad, I urge your readers to keep an eye out for a forthcoming Meryton Press title, Mistaken, by Jessie Lewis, due out later this year. Thanks again, Serena, for your support of My Mr. Darcy & Your Mr. Bingley, and the kind attention of your readers!

Thank you Linda for sharing your thoughts on poetry, Shakespeare, and your novel for National Poetry Month.

About the Author:

Linda Beutler’s professional life is spent in a garden, an organic garden housing America’s foremost public collection of clematis vines and a host of fabulous companion plants. Her home life reveals a more personal garden, still full of clematis, but also antique roses and vintage perennials planted around and over a 1907 cottage. But one can never have enough of gardening, so in 2011 she began cultivating a weedy patch of Jane Austen Fan Fiction ideas. The first of these to ripen was The Red Chrysanthemum (Meryton Press, 2013), which won a silver IPPY for romance writing in 2014. You might put this down as beginner’s luck—Linda certainly does.  The next harvest brought Longbourn to London (Meryton Press, 2014), known widely as “the [too] sexy one”. In 2015 Meryton Press published the bestseller A Will of Iron, a macabre rom-com based on the surprising journals of Anne de Bourgh.

Now, after a year-long break in JAFF writing to produce Plant Lovers Guide to Clematis (Timber Press, 2016)—the third in a bouquet of books on gardening—we have My Mr. Darcy and Your Mr. Bingley bursting into bloom.  The eBook is available on Amazon; paperbacks coming soon.

Visit her on Twitter, Facebook, and on her website.

Giveaway:

Enter the giveaway for one of 8 eBooks; It’s open internationally.

Terms and Conditions:

Readers may enter the drawing by tweeting once a day and daily commenting on a blog post that has a giveaway attached for the tour. (1 comment/blog post) Entrants should provide the name of the blog where they commented (which will be verified). You may enter once by following the author on twitter and once by following the author on Facebook.

Remember, tweet daily and comment once per post with a giveaway to earn extra entries. Each winner will be randomly selected by Rafflecopter.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good Luck!

  • LorenDushku

    I thought exactly this when I was reading the chapter. Darcy and Elizabeth’s actions form a play within the play where you can easily think of Darcy and Lizzy as Othello and Desdemona. Thank you for sharing this!

  • Janet T

    Fantastic post, Linda! I adored the referenced scene in the book. It was fabulous and the emotions were high! I could feel them as I read. Well done. The way you tied this all in with the Othello play at the theatre was a masterpiece. Thank you for such a good book and an insightful post!

    Thank you, Serena, for taking part in the tour and having this post stay with your theme for the month. I loved it!

  • Pricilla T

    Thanks for the post. I’ve read a few posts about this book and am excited to read it.

    • Linda Beutler

      You are welcome, Priscilla! Yet to come on the tour are my musings on pansies, an interview with Jane Bennet, an interview with me, and a little scene with Georgiana and Darcy after she finds herself in the unique position of being able to boost his confidence. Stay tuned!

  • Anji Dee

    Wow, that scene sounds pretty intense Linda! Thanks for sharing your thoughts and explanations of it.

    Despite it’s darkness and bleakness, Othello is one of my favourite Shakespeare plays, as is “the Scottish play”. My school actually put on a performance of Othello when I was in my final year before going off to University. Although I wasn’t studying English Literature at that stage (sciences were my subjects) I helped out as one of the “behind the scenes” workers (stage lighting) – treading the boards just isn’t my thing at all. It helped me gain a new appreciation for the Bard’s writing as we had to try to use the lighting to evoke or mirror not just the events happening on stage but also the emotions.

    Poetry isn’t one of my strong points, though English Lit. did help me appreciate the works of John Keats.

    • Linda Beutler

      It was intense to write, but I figured if other JAFF authors I really admire could “go dark” so could I. After having a look at teenaged diaries, I realized I was 17 when I saw Othello. That same trip I saw The Importance of Being Earnest, which immediately sealed my adoration of Wilde and the comedic possibilities of cantankerous old ladies. (Frankly, I think Judi Dench was a far better Lady Augusta Bracknell than a Lady Catherine de Bourgh.)

      • Anji Dee

        That’s the exact same age as me when you saw Othello, Linda. I was 18 when I left school but my birthday wasn’t long before the end of term and our Othello was performed just before the previous Christmas.

        I so agree with you about Judi Dench. Back in 2005 I was thrilled to bits when I saw she’d been cast as Lady C, as I love her work, but was really disappointed in the way she performed this particular role. It was on TV again here last night and I haven’t changed my mind.

  • Gail Warner

    This is a brilliant chapter, Linda – the emotion of both main characters is palpable. You have mastered the art of portraying real emotion!

    • Linda Beutler

      Finally! It took four tries. 😉

  • Suko

    Thanks for offering this generous giveaway! I enjoyed the author’s guest post a great deal.

    • Linda Beutler

      Thank you, Suko, and best of luck with the giveaway!

  • DarcyBennett

    Great post. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and for the giveaway.

    • Linda Beutler

      You’re welcome! Hoping you win!

  • Beau North

    Awesome post, Linda! You’re getting to be an expert on weaving the Bard in with Austen!

    • Linda Beutler

      My next “victim” will be P.G. Wodehouse. Maybe after that, Jane Austen will collide with Oscar Wilde.

  • Daniela Quadros

    Great post! Congratulations, Linda, on the release!

    • Linda Beutler

      Thank you, Daniela. This was a challenge, but Serena was great to work with.

  • Vesper Meikle

    Unfortunately Othello is not the one play that I have read

    • Linda Beutler

      Oh my! Hope I have not spoiled anything Vesper, but of course you know Othello doesn’t end well, unlike my story! HEA’s everywhere!

  • Anna (Diary of an Eccentric)

    I really enjoyed this post. I’m looking forward to reading the book even more now!

    • Linda Beutler

      Thanks, Anna! Do keep in mind that I rather consider the whole of My Mr. Darcy & Your Mr. Bingley to be light and entertaining! This is really the darkest it gets, so no worries for those readers who are angst-phobic!