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41st Virtual Poetry Circle

Are you ready for the 41st Virtual Poetry Circle this week?  I hope you are because we’re continuing the celebration of National Poetry Month.

If you missed my earlier announcement (don’t worry, it’s a sticky post), you can check out the 2010 National Poetry Month Blog Tour details here.

Today, we’re going to visit with a classic poet.

Death, Be Not Proud (Holy Sonnet 10) by John Donne:

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou are not so;

For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,

Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,

And soonest our best men with thee do go,

Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.

Thou'art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,

And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,

And poppy'or charms can make us sleep as well

And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?

One short sleep past, we wake eternally,

Remember, this is just for fun and is not meant to be stressful.

Keep in mind what Molly Peacock’s books suggested. Look at a line, a stanza, sentences, and images; describe what you like or don’t like; and offer an opinion. If you missed my review of her book, check it out here.

Let me know your thoughts, ideas, feelings, impressions. Let’s have a great discussion…pick a line, pick an image, pick a sentence.

I’ve you missed the other Virtual Poetry Circles, check them out here. It’s never too late to join the discussion.

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Please also stop by today’s National Poetry Month Blog Tour stop at She Is Too Fond of Books and A Circle of Books.

  • “Thou’art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
    And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,”

    I just love these violent images in this section of the poem. It makes you remember that many of us fear death for a reason.

  • I love the “why swell’st thou then?” Such a passionate belief in an afterlife!

  • I’m not a fan of the “thous” and the “dosts” but I came to the same conclusion as bookworm. There’s nothing you can do to escape it, and we shouldn’t fear it.
    .-= Anna´s last blog ..Review: Mr. Darcy Broke My Heart by Beth Pattillo =-.

  • bookworm

    I think he’s talking about how death comes for us all. ‘And soonest our best men with thee do go’ . We can’t escape death. But I also think that by saying ‘Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou are not so’,
    he’s saying we shouldnt fear death, there is heaven on the other side.