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Mailbox Monday #497

Mailbox Monday has become a tradition in the blogging world, and many of us thank Martha of The Printed Page for creating it.

It now has it’s own blog where book bloggers can link up their own mailbox posts and share which books they bought or which they received for review from publishers, authors, and more.

Leslie, Martha, and I also will share our picks from everyone’s links in the new feature Books that Caught Our Eye. We hope you’ll join us.

Here’s what we received:

DC Super Hero Girls: Search for Atlantis by Shea Fontana and Yancey Labat for review in October.

Things are going swimmingly for new students Mera and Raven until afield trip to Mera’s hometown of Atlantis when they find that the underwater city has vanished! Batgirl, Supergirl, Wonder Woman, Bumblebee, Raven, Miss Martian, and Starfire discover that Atlantis has been shrunk and bottled by the powerful villain Brainiac. This gigantic problem calls for a small solution and to infiltrate Brainiac’s bottled city collection, Bumblebee and Raven combine technology with magic to shrink the heroes. But will they save the lost city of Atlantis or will their little plan lead to even bigger trouble?

Afterland by Mai Der Vang, which I purchased.

Afterland is a powerful, essential collection of poetry that recounts with devastating detail the Hmong exodus from Laos and the fate of thousands of refugees seeking asylum. Mai Der Vang is telling the story of her own family, and by doing so, she also provides an essential history of the Hmong culture’s ongoing resilience in exile. Many of these poems are written in the voices of those fleeing unbearable violence after U.S. forces recruited Hmong fighters in Laos in the Secret War against communism, only to abandon them after that war went awry. That history is little known or understood, but the three hundred thousand Hmong now living in the United States are living proof of its aftermath. With poems of extraordinary force and grace, Afterland holds an original place in American poetry and lands with a sense of humanity saved, of outrage, of a deep tradition broken by war and ocean but still intact, remembered, and lived.

What did you receive?