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Giveaway: Madame Tussaud by Michelle Moran

As many of you already know, this month Michelle Moran‘s latest historical fiction novel, Madame Tussaud, comes out February 15 in stores.

Book synopsis:

Marie Tussaud has learned the secrets of wax sculpting by working alongside her uncle in their celebrated wax museum, the Salon de Cire. From her popular model of the American Ambassador, Thomas Jefferson, to her tableau of the royal family at dinner, Marie’s museum provides Parisians with the very latest news on fashion, gossip, even politics. Her customers hail from every walk of life, and when word arrives that the royals themselves are coming to see their likenesses, Marie never dreams that the king’s sister will request her presence at Versailles as a royal tutor in wax sculpting. Yet when a letter with a gold seal is delivered to her home, Marie knows she cannot refuse—even if it means time away from her beloved Salon and her increasingly dear friend, Henri Charles.  . . .

Spanning five years from the budding revolution to the Reign of Terror, Madame Tussaud brings us into the world of an incredible heroine whose talent for wax modeling saved her life and preserved the faces of a vanished kingdom.

Michelle is generously offering 1 signed copy of Madame Tussaud to one of my readers anywhere in the world, along with a pair of Marie Antoinette cupcake earrings.

To Enter:

1.  Leave a comment about what you know about the French Revolution or if you have ever visited a wax museum and where.

2.  Facebook, Tweet, or blog about the giveaway and get a second entry.

Deadline to enter is Feb. 19, 2011, at 11:59PM EST

  • I’m sorry to say that other than the “let them eat cake” remark and her beheading I know very little about the French Revolution.

  • Carol M
  • Carol M

    Most of what I know came from reading A Tale of Two Cities and that was a long time ago. I’ve never been to a was museum but I would like to someday.

  • I know that the French revolution was a long time ago 🙂 and I have been to the Wax Museum in St. Augustine, Fl…kind of give me the creeps but the figures are amazing. Would LOVE to read about the real Madame so thanks for the chance!
    Bingo (Karen)´s last blog post ..HIS OTHER WIFE- INTERVIEW- REVIEW- AND GIVEAWAY

  • Ann

    I’ve always been interested in this period of history and visited the wax museum many times when I lived in London. Sounds like an interesting book.
    Ann

  • Margie

    I admit too that I know little about the French Revolution, and didn’t realize that Tussaud was a real person. So this book will be a learning experience too.

  • Pam Keener

    I believe the play Les Misarables was about the French Revolution and if so that is sadly all I know. I loved the play. I have never been to a wax museum either.
    I would love to win this giveaway though.
    Love & Hugs,
    Pam
    pk4290(at)comcast(dot)net

  • Cathie

    I’ve never been to a wax museum, not sure there’s any close to me.
    I’ve never really studied the French Revolution. I did however spend a whole afternoon reading about the guillotine due to a contest Michelle had on her web page. It was very interesting!

    [email protected]

    http://twitter.com/greatmasteryoda/status/37887100565061632
    http://www.facebook.com/cathie.veres/posts/142336345828423

  • Michele L

    I’ve never been to a wax museum, but I’ve always wanted to. I’d love to see Mme. Tussaud’s original work (I know they exist but aren’t on display).
    I’ve done a little reading on the French revolution and know that Marie Antoinette was a scapegoat and she never said, “Let them eat cake”
    rlawrence110(at)yahoo.com

  • Rachel W.

    I know a bit about the French Revolution- mostly from other historical novels. Thanks for the giveaway!

  • Jessica M.

    I actually love reading about the French Revolution. I did a paper in college comparing the French Revolution to the Cuban Revolution (I was a poli sci major). And I also love wax museums! I’ve been to one that’s in Buena Park CA I think, by Knott’s Berry Farm. And more importantly, I’ve been to the Madame Tussaud’s wax museum in Las Vegas, which was definitely really cool.

  • phxbne
  • phxbne

    When I was in London as a kid I went to Madame Tussaud’s and loved it

  • I’d love to read this!
    I haven’t been to a wax museum yet but going to Amsterdam in April and hoping to go then.

    crimson_haze(at)hotmail(dot)com
    Elysium´s last blog post ..Teaser Tuesdays 142

  • I know a moderate amount of information about the French Revolution, although I’ll confess that I didn’t know Madame Tussaud’s position in prominent society until I started reading the author information for this book at various blog giveaways. I’d love to win a copy of Madame Tussaud!
    shetreadssoftly(at)gmail(dot)com
    Lori L (she treads softly)´s last blog post ..Leviathan

  • Carol Wong

    I started to get interested in the French revolution i n my high school world history class and later in French Literature class in college. It was so disappointing for grand ambitions of a democracy to collapse into te reign of terror. I would love to read more about the women leaders and the women writers of the time. Don’t think that they are ever mentioned in the history books.

    CarolNWong(at)aol(dot)com

  • Bastille Day, which celebrates the Revolution is on July 14th.
    thank you
    Patty´s last blog post ..Tuesday Treat – Tomato Beef

  • Sandra K321

    When I was young, my mom and I visited my grandparents in England and one of the places that was high on my list to visit was Madame Tussaud’s. I loved it!

  • Susan

    I posted this giveaway on my Facebook page as Susan Clarke Taylor.

    susanbillietaylor [at] gmail [dot] com

  • Susan

    Recently I read that the Bastille doesn’t exist any more. That surprised me. The French Revolution should never be forgotten. The rich had all the comforts while the poor starved.

    susanbillietaylor [at] gmail [dot] com

  • nan

    The French Revolution was basically an end to Absolute Monarchy, and the birth of more modern ideas (rights of the common man, secularism, etc). Never been to a wax museum but would love to go…as long as I don’t get locked in after dark.

  • I don’t know much about the French Revolution, which is why I’m excited about this book. You know my only wax museum trip was to Madame Tussaud’s in NYC with you and The Girl. 😉

    No need to enter me, but I’ve added the giveaway to my sidebar.
    Anna´s last blog post ..Guest Post- Michelle Moran- Author of Madame Tussaud

  • I visited the Madame Tussaud’s in Hollywood when I was 15 while vacationing with my parents. I loved it! I also visited a small wax museum in New Orleans back in 1999. Wax museums really fascinate me.

    I shared on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/michellestockardmiller/posts/198159206863743

    Thanks for the chance!
    Michelle @ The True Book Addict´s last blog post ..MAILBOX MONDAY TUESDAY EDITION

  • Hira Hasnain
  • Hira Hasnain

    Some of my favorite novels are based on the French Revolution, such as “The Tale of Two Cities”, and “The Scarlet Pimpernel”. I think it was a really turbulent time, rife with socio-political upheaval – the rich were getting richer, the poor were getting poorer, and the guillotine was coming down on the necks of any who dared to be the voice of dissidence to the governing politicians.

    I have visited both the Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum in London, as well as the one here in Los Angeles. Although the one here in LA seems to have a more lively air to it, I rather preferred the one in London – I loved the wax replicas of the politicians, and the serial killers the most. I thought the wax replica of Aishwarya Rai was exceptionally amazing, since I’ve met her and the replica looks exactly like her! I’d LOVE to read this book…and I’d be the happiest if I was to win this giveaway! 🙂

  • I don’t know a lot about French Revolution except what I have read in Historical Fiction novels. From what I can remember, the violence after the onset of the revolution was called the Reign of Terror.

    [email protected]

  • Dawn

    I remember first learning about the French Revolution when I was a teenager. Or maybe I should say, found myself intrigued for the first time when I sat down to watch a classic movie that I hadn’t heard anything of before. It was the 1930’s version of ‘Marie Antoinette’ starring Norma Shearer and Tyrone Power. Oh my gosh, the costumes and hair were so incredible that it didn’t seem like it was a black and white film. I was entranced from that day forward, I needed to know more about this woman, who had it all and lost everything. Over time I wanted to learn more about the different personages involved, and to see events from both sides of the conflict, which is why I like HF because it gives you a more tangible connection. I am beyond excited to read this book for this unique perspective.

    DaSwee94(at)yahoo(dot)com

  • I’ve read a couple of books on the French Revolution, including my all time favorite: “it is a far far better thing I do here….” (Tale of Two Cities) and of course the latest Jennifer Donnelly book, Revolution, and a variety of nonfiction as well. I may have gone to a wax museum once when I was little, but maybe I just always wanted to and never did! :–)

    Please enter me!
    nbmars AT yahoo DOT com
    rhapsodyinbooks´s last blog post ..Review of “Sweethearts” by Sara Zarr

  • jasmin

    the french revolution started due to the fact that the king and the clergy exploited the people and their money. the corruption was bad enough that Marie Antoinette said “Let them have cake” when asked what the people would eat because they did not have enough bread. it was a bloody revolution based on the motto of equality, liberty and fraternity
    thank you
    [email protected]

  • Amanda W
  • Amanda W

    I don’t think I know anything about the French Revolution.

  • Patricia Boyle

    I visited a few was museums – in Los Angeles, London, and Montreal.

  • I really enjoyed Michelle’s Nefertiti. I know quite a lot about the French Revolution, including the use of the term “left” and “right” (politically speaking) which started when the assembly met. The left were the radicals.

    I would love to read this book. quailcreekpub[email protected].

  • I shared on facebook and twitter, thanks!

    Amanda
    libraryofmyown at gmail dot com
    Amanda´s last blog post ..What Im Doing Now

  • In my college class I got completely confused about the French Revolution. But then I read Catherine Delors’ book Mistress of the Revolution and I was completely enthralled and she explained stuff so well. I’d love to read Moran’s book since I know she’d do an amazing job as well. I’ve never been to a wax museum though. Thanks!

    Amanda
    libraryofmyown at gmail dot com
    Amanda´s last blog post ..What Im Doing Now

  • Amanda

    What a great giveaway! I’ve been looking forward to this book for awhile, so I’d love to win!

    I don’t know a whole lot about the French Revolution, I have however visited a wax museum in Portland, Oregon, back when I was in high school. Lots of fun!
    Amanda´s last blog post ..Non-Fiction Monday- Animal Colors

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  • I visited the wax museum in Las Vegas several years ago. I’ve heard great things about this book and am really looking forward to reading it.

  • Linda B

    I’ve read a few HF novels set during the French Revolution. It seems so sad that what started as a plea from the people for better living conditions, for freedom from hunger, etc. then collapsed into the horrible Reign of Terror, as the leaders were corrupted by their power.
    I’d love to read this book. Thanks for the giveaway

  • C

    The best wax museum I ever visited was in London, which, yes, was Madame Tussaud’s. My favorite part (and, really the creepiest) was a long, dungeon-like corridor where various wax models of serial killers were held. (Thankfully, they were behind bars.) Each wax killer came with a description of his brutal crimes. The killers were all surprisingly short, some clearly only about five feet. At the end of the hallway was the blade that apparently severed Marie Antoinette’s head. To me, this was a perfect distillation of all the things I associate with Madame Tussaud: mystery and the violence of the French Revolution.

  • I have this one on the way — I can’t wait to read it!! So no need to enter me, altho I do covet those earrings! I have to confess, I hadn’t realized Madame Tussaud was a real person so I’m so excited to dig into this book!
    Audra´s last blog post ..Muslim Women Reformers by Ida Lichter

  • Ruth @ Bookish Ruth

    I honestly don’t know that much about the French Revolution other than what I learned in high school. The thing that stuck with me the most was the description of how death by guillotine was supposedly painless — “just a cool breeze of air about the neck”.

    I’ve never been to a wax museum but the next time I’m in NYC, I’m definitely going to check out Madame Tussuad’s.
    Ruth @ Bookish Ruth´s last blog post ..Mailbox Monday- Valentines Day Edition