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Grammar Lesson…I Think Not!

Previously, I discussed how poets can turn readers onto another perspective regarding a given topic. The poem I selected from Poet Lore’s Summer 2007 issue highlights another quality of poetry–the imagination.

“On the Origin of Punctuation Marks” by Elizabeth Klise von Zerneck, the poet postulates how punctuation came to be as we know it. As a writer, I fully understand the power of words, but without punctuation, much of each word’s emphasis could be lost in breath. Klise von Zerneck suggests these punctuation marks fell from trees, like branches, bark, or acorns would, and bent or rolled upon hitting the ground.

As the poet discusses the random ways in which these marks are shaped by the environment into which they fell, the reader can picture the periods, question marks, and exclamation points as much more than grammatical elements. “The bent twigs paused, and wavered, caught against/” and “pods burrowed deep, and deeper, then reversed/ and grew up toward the sky…some straight as reeds/” Too many of us forget the beauty of punctuation, not only as a means to provide meaning and power behind our words, but also as aesthetic adornment on the page.

So ends my grammar lesson.

The Nuances of Spoons

Poets have a unique job to highlight the beauty of the mundane, the grotesque, and the world in general. However, many view poets as the keepers of emotion and profound insight, which may or may not be true. As part of my new poetic strategy to keep up on contemporary poetry, I have subscribed to several literary journals. In the Summer 2007 issue of Poet Lore, published by the Writer’s Center in Bethesda, Md, “Spoons, An Appreciation” by Tim Barnes caught my eye.

In the lines, “but to spoon is to make love, cuddle together” and “but spoons are the shapes of breasts and buttocks” Barnes forces the reader to check the utensil drawer, pick up a spoon, and view it with a different perspective. To make the sensuality of a spoon more clear, he sharply contrasts spoons with knives and forks. He illustrates how knives and forks, poke, jab, and sever meat and vegetables, while spoons covet, cup, and hold food gently in an embrace, like a lover.

The light-hearted poem reminds me how powerful words can be, especially in changing readers’ minds about various subjects, whether it be a spoon or war. I think too often these days, readers and writers are reliant upon cliche and fail to view the world afresh.