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277th Virtual Poetry Circle

Welcome to the 277th Virtual Poetry Circle!

Remember, this is just for fun and is not meant to be stressful.

Keep in mind what Molly Peacock’s book suggested.

Look at a line, a stanza, sentences, and images; describe what you like or don’t like; and offer an opinion. If you missed my review of her book, check it out here.

Today’s poem is from Claude McKay, recited by Connor Noonan:

Romance

To clasp you now and feel your head close-pressed,
Scented and warm against my beating breast;

To whisper soft and quivering your name,
And drink the passion burning in your frame;

To lie at full length, taut, with cheek to cheek,
And tease your mouth with kisses till you speak

Love words, mad words, dream words, sweet senseless words,
Melodious like notes of mating birds;

To hear you ask if I shall love always,
And myself answer: Till the end of days;

To feel your easeful sigh of happiness
When on your trembling lips I murmur: Yes;

It is so sweet. We know it is not true.
What matters it? The night must shed her dew.

We know it is not true, but it is sweet—
The poem with this music is complete.

What do you think?

Something Wicked Read-a-Long

Ti and Sandy are hosting the Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury read-a-long.  We’re discussing it on blogs and Twitter with the hashtag #EnterTheRingmaster.

We read the second section, which is Ch. 25-44, and it is getting tougher to hold off reading the rest before the final discussion on Halloween!

This section moved a lot more quickly for me with the hiding from the carnival gang and the boys being scared out of their minds.  Will and Jim are still a bit interchangeable to me, but at this point I’m over it.  And the language hasn’t been as difficult to get through — it’s like they have some kind of mid-western dialect or some language that’s all their own.  The revelations about the carnival were not all that revealing to me, but maybe that’s because I’ve read too much Stephen King and other odd little stories about carnivals.  But it wasn’t so predictable that it made me stop reading.

I am still wondering about the relationship between Will and his father and why they have never communicated before now, and where are Jim’s parents — we know he at least have a mother — but where has she been all this time.  It seems like his parents are not around much for him, which is why he seems to be expected to get in trouble.

By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review by Pamela Paul

Source: Henry Holt & Company
Hardcover, 336 pgs
On Amazon and on Kobo

By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review edited by Pamela Paul, foreword by Scott Turow, is a collection of question-and-answers from The New York Times Book Review with authors, scientists, and more.  Some of these questions stay the same, like what their favorite books are, what genres are their guilty pleasures, and what books disappointed them.  Any book lover who does or does not read the Book Review (though why wouldn’t you) will want this book to get the inside scoop on writers and their writing and reading lives.

Pamela Paul knows just what questions other readers want answered from their favorite authors, and she knows that starting conversations about what people are reading can lead to some in-depth and interesting questions — even philosophical ones.  “Asking someone what she’s read lately is an easy conversational gambit … It also serves an actual purpose: we may find out about something we want to read ourselves,” Pamela Paul says in the introduction.

As Turow says in his foreword, “whether a given writer likes or abhors a given book, all writers probably would concede that … they are who they are because of every one of the books with which they’ve ‘stoofed’ themselves during their lifetimes.”  Book lovers of all ages will love this compilation because they will find something else to read, increase the size of their stacks, and experience the deep appreciation writers and artists have for one another and their work.

By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review edited by Pamela Paul, foreword by Scott Turow, is a fantastic compilation of interviews.  Some interviews are humorous, while others are more serious.  The book itself is likely to garner The New York Times Book Review a few more subscribers.

About the Author:

Pamela Paul is the editor of The New York Times Book Review and the author of Parenting, Inc., Pornified, and The Starter Marriage and the Future of Matrimony. Prior to joining the Times, Paul was a contributor to Time magazine and The Economist, and her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and Vogue. She and her family live in New York.  Visit her website and her on Twitter.

72nd book for 2014 New Author Reading Challenge.

Giveaway: Still, At Your Door by Emma Eden Ramos

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Land of Dreams by Kate Kerrigan

Source: William Morrow and TLC Book Tours Paperback, 336 pages On Amazon and on Kobo Land of Dreams by Kate Kerrigan, the third book in the Ellis Island trilogy (Ellis Island and City of Hope), could be read alone as Kerrigan provides enough background on Ellie Hogan that new readers could pick this one up […]

Mailbox Monday #293

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Sisterhood of the Bloggers World Award!

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276th Virtual Poetry Circle

Welcome to the 276th Virtual Poetry Circle! Remember, this is just for fun and is not meant to be stressful. Keep in mind what Molly Peacock’s book suggested. Look at a line, a stanza, sentences, and images; describe what you like or don’t like; and offer an opinion. If you missed my review of her […]