Quantcast

National Poetry Month Tour Schedule & Linky

Welcome to the 2014 National Poetry Month: Reach for the Horizon Blog Tour!

I do have a couple open dates still, but this is the schedule for April 2014 as it stands, with our first post on Savvy Verse & Wit and Rhapsody in Books!

April 1: Beth Hoffman and Rhapsody in Books
April 2: Book Snob
April 3: Bermudaonion
April 4: Tabatha Yeatts
April 5: Rhapsody in Books and Still Unfinished
April 6: Rhapsody in Books
April 7: The Bluestocking Society
April 8: the bookworm
April 9:  Lost in Books
April 10: Come, Sit By The Hearth
April 11:  Book Dilettante
April 12:  Rhapsody in Books
April 13: I’d Rather Be at the Beach
April 14:  Sophisticated Dorkiness
April 15:  Reader Buzz
April 16:  Everything Distils Into Reading
April 17: Necromancy Never Pays
April 18: Peeking Between the Pages
April 19:  Rhapsody in Books
April 20:  Rhapsody in Books
April 21:  Burning the Bridges
April 22:  Erica Goss
April 23:  Diary of an Eccentric
April 24:  Emma Eden Ramos
April 25: Melissa Firman
April 26: Beth Kephart
April 27:  I’d Rather Be at the Beach
April 28:  Regular Rumination
April 29:  Mary McCray
April 30:  Tabatha Yeatts

For those participating this year, please leave your post link below:

Nefertiti in the Flak Tower by Clive James

Source: Liveright
Hardcover, 96 pages
I am an Amazon Affiliate

Nefertiti in the Flak Tower by Clive James is a collection of rhyming and metered poems that relies heavily on history, particularly that of WWII, to make connections about the resiliency of human kind in the face of horrifying adversity.  The title poem, Nefertiti in the Flak Tower, does use the history of the Nefertiti bust as a German treasure that was moved and protected in a Flak Tower during WWII, towers that were built to protect cities like Berlin from air raids with guns and shelter citizens.  Beyond the historically based poems, there are poems about the life of a writer and his friends and how even these glamorous lives of signing books can become mundane, but there are those moments that make even the most thankless jobs worthwhile.

From "Grief Has Its Time" (page 81)

"Free of such burdens, I pursue my course
Supposing myself blessed with the light touch,
A blithesome ease my principal resource.
Sometimes on stage I even say as much,

Or did, till one night in the signing queue
An ancient lady touched my wrist and said
I'd made her smile the way he used to do
When hearts were won by how a young man read

Aloud, and decent girls were led astray
By sweet speech. "Can you put his name with mine?
Before the war, before he went away,
We used to read together." Last in line

She had all my attention, so I wrote"

James comes across as both romantic and removed.  The rhyming poems can linger in the mind when the emotion is clear and connects with the reader, but there are other occasions when the rhymes seem forced and throw off the rhythm of the poem, creating a disconnect between the reader and the subject.  Nefertiti in the Flak Tower by Clive James is a mix of some really great poems that will leave a lasting impression and those that fall a little flat on first and second reading.

Book 10 for the Dive Into Poetry Reading Challenge 2014.

 

 

 

16th book for 2014 New Author Challenge.

 

 

 

For today’s 2014 National Poetry Month: Reach for the Horizon tour stop, click the image below:

Any Anxious Body by Chrissy Kolaya

Source: the poet, Chrissy Kolaya
Paperback, 96 pages
I am an Amazon Affiliate

Any Anxious Body by Chrissy Kolaya does not have the most eye-catching cover, but what’s in side will knock your socks off!  Beginning with what readers may see as someone who lived through the Great Depression when saving everything counted toward survival, Kolaya uses early memories and events overheard to not only connect generation to generation, but to weave a thread through each struggle and moment of unease and concern that each moment is fleeting.  Humans are in a perpetually anxious state, sometimes without knowing it, because our lives are finite and each moment has a beginning and end — often ending before we’re ready to deal with it.

From “Fired” (page 17)

His friend –
the one married just out of high school,
runs his eyes over you,
smoothing the skin over your bones.

Kolaya — using notes from a great grandmother who no longer can verbally communicate and a letter from her daughter — has a visceral sense of not only the human body and its reactions to touch, but also the emotional connections between family and lovers. Her verses are fresh and evoke a response from her readers immediately. While there is a sense of contemplation about life events and family connections, the poems also never forget to remind readers that too much thinking can prevent life from happening.

From “Polarity” (page 15)

She wants to talk about how it will work
and I think:
I will move toward you in a moment or two,
and you should do the same.

Any Anxious Body by Chrissy Kolaya has created a reflective collection of poems, a collection that requires the reader to listen to the voices, to the moments, to the memories, but more importantly to open themselves up to the experience.  Each poem’s voice changes perspective, providing readers with the fullest view of living as possible, and sometimes those perspectives can leave you squirming.

About the Author:

Chrissy Kolaya is a poet and fiction writer. Her short fiction has been included in the anthologies New Sudden Fiction (Norton) and Fiction on a Stick (Milkweed Editions). Her poems and fiction have appeared in a number of literary journals.

She has received a Norman Mailer Writers Colony summer scholarship, an Anderson Center for Interdisciplinary Studies fellowship, a Loft Mentor Series Award in Poetry, and grants from the Minnesota State Arts Board, the Lake Region Arts Council, and the University of Minnesota. She teaches writing at the University of Minnesota Morris. Check out her blog and her Facebook page.

15th book for 2014 New Author Challenge.

 

 

 

Book 9 for the Dive Into Poetry Reading Challenge 2014.

 

 

For today’s 2014 National Poetry Month: Reach for the Horizon tour stop, click the image below:

Mailbox Monday #266

Mailbox Monday, created by Marcia at To Be Continued, formerly The Printed Page, has gone through a few incarnations from a permanent home with Marcia to a tour of other blogs.

Now, it has its own permanent home at its own blog.

To check out what everyone has received over the last week, visit the blog and check out the links.  Leave yours too.

Also, each week, Leslie, Vicki, and I will share the Books that Caught Our Eye from everyone’s weekly links.

Here’s what I received:

1.  The Pigeon Needs a Bath by Mo Willems, which I purchased on Amazon for the little one’s Easter basket.

The Pigeon really needs a bath! Except, the Pigeon’s not so sure about that. Besides, he took a bath last month! Maybe. It’s going to take some serious convincing to try and get the Pigeon to take the plunge.

 

What we snagged at the library sale:

2. The Violets of March by Sarah Jio

In her twenties, Emily Wilson was on top of the world: she had a bestselling novel, a husband plucked from the pages of GQ, and a one-way ticket to happily ever after.

Ten years later, the tide has turned on Emily’s good fortune. So when her great-aunt Bee invites her to spend the month of March on Bainbridge Island in Washington State, Emily accepts, longing to be healed by the sea. Researching her next book, Emily discovers a red velvet diary, dated 1943, whose contents reveal startling connections to her own life.

3. Blackberry Winter by Sarah Jio

Seattle, 1933. Single mother Vera Ray kisses her three-year-old son, Daniel, goodnight and departs to work the night-shift at a local hotel. She emerges to discover that a May-Day snow has blanketed the city, and that her son has vanished. Outside, she finds his beloved teddy bear lying face-down on an icy street, the snow covering up any trace of his tracks, or the perpetrator’s.

Seattle, 2010. Seattle Herald reporter Claire Aldridge, assigned to cover the May 1 “blackberry winter” storm and its twin, learns of the unsolved abduction and vows to unearth the truth. In the process, she finds that she and Vera may be linked in unexpected ways.

4.  Home Front by Kristin Hannah

Like many couples, Michael and Jolene Zarkades have to face the pressures of everyday life–children, careers, bills, chores–even as their twelve-year marriage is falling apart. Then an unexpected deployment sends Jolene deep into harm’s way and leaves defense attorney Michael at home, unaccustomed to being a single parent to their two girls. As a mother, it agonizes Jolene to leave her family, but as a soldier she has always understood the true meaning of duty. In her letters home, she paints a rose-colored version of her life on the front lines, shielding her family from the truth. But war will change Jolene in ways that none of them could have foreseen. When tragedy strikes, Michael must face his darkest fear and fight a battle of his own–for everything that matters to his family.

5. My Little Pony: Fashion Fun by Ann Marie Capalija, illustrated by Ken Edwards

The ponies are putting on a fashion show. Sew-and-So has created designs that are perfect for all her pony friends — and something extra special to help Minty be a real showstopper.

 

 

6.  Disney Princess: Lights and Glamour

7.  Rosie Rabbit Goes to Preschool by Patrick Yee

You can help Rosie Rabbit open her schoolbag, count to five, and jump rope! And you can play a fun search game in every scene, too.

 

8.  Shaggy Dog and the Terrible Itch by David Bedford and Gwyneth Williamson

Shaggy Dog has a terrible itch – it just won’t go away! So, in desperation, he runs to the Poodle Parlour for a good shampoo. Will Shaggy Dog ever get rid of his terrible itch?

 

9. Newton by Rory Tyger

Newton is an adorable child-like bear with stuffed animal friends. When he and his stuffies hear a series of scary noises at bedtime, it’s up to Newton to figure out the explanation for each!

 

10. Disney Princess: How Romantic

11.  Sesame Street: Monster Tales The Big Boo!

12. Disney Princess First Words – My Wipe-off Book (English & Spanish)

 

What did you receive?

For today’s 2014 National Poetry Month: Reach for the Horizon tour stop, click the image below:

National Poetry Month Tour Schedule & Linky

Welcome to the 2014 National Poetry Month: Reach for the Horizon Blog Tour! I do have a couple open dates still, but this is the schedule for April 2014 as it stands, with our first post on Savvy Verse & Wit and Rhapsody in Books! April 1: Beth Hoffman and Rhapsody in Books April 2: […]

bookspine

Book Spine Poetry

I’ve always loved exercises that have people thinking outside their comfort zones.  For National Poetry Month, I would love to see what everyone can create out of book spines to make their own poem. Take some books (doesn’t have to be just poetry), place them in an order that makes sense to you, and you’ll […]

249th Virtual Poetry Circle

Welcome to the 249th Virtual Poetry Circle! Remember, this is just for fun and is not meant to be stressful. Keep in mind what Molly Peacock’s book suggested. Look at a line, a stanza, sentences, and images; describe what you like or don’t like; and offer an opinion. If you missed my review of her […]

April Read-a-Long for I Am Regina by Sally M. Keehn

Today, I’m interrupting the flow of poets and poetry to remind everyone who was interested in the 2014 War Challenge With a Twist read-a-long of I am Regina by Sally M. Keehn this month, that today is discussion day. I’ll be over at War Through the Generations today with Anna talking about Ch. 1-13 of […]

Longfellow image

Ode to Childhood: Poetry to Celebrate the Child edited by Samuel Carr

Source: Sterling Children’s Books Hardcover, 96 pages I am an Amazon Affiliate Ode to Childhood: Poetry to Celebrate the Child by Samuel Carr is a collection of poems from a variety of poets about children, parenthood, and their own childhoods, and no collection about children would be complete without William Blake, who has four poems […]

Poetry for Young People: Langston Hughes edited by David Roessel and Arnold Rampersad, illustrated by Benny Andrews

Source: Sterling Children’s Books Hardcover, 48 pages I am an Amazon Affiliate Poetry for Young People: Langston Hughes edited by David Roessel and Arnold Rampersad, illustrated by Benny Andrews for ages 8+, is a collection of poems that won the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award in 2007.  Hughes’ poems grew from a love of Whitman […]